Djab Wurrung

 

LANGUAGE NAME:                                                                   

Various historical pronunciations for the DJAB WURRUNG are:

"Chaap wuurong, Chaa wuurong [presumably a mistranscription], Chaap wurru, Tyapwurru, Chap wurong, Tyapwurong, Chapwurong, Tjapwurrun, Tyapwuron, Djabwurung, Tjap, Chaap-Warrong, Djabwuru, Tjapwurung, Chaap-wurra, Thapwurong, Jab wurrung, Tjap-wurrung, Tijapwurong, [mistranscription], Tjap-wurong, Jab Wurrong, Tjapwuurong, Chap wurrung, Chaapwuurong, Dyabwurung, Tyapawurru, Dyapwurong, Djab wurung." (Clark, 1990, p.106)

 

FIRST RECORDED:

Earliest reference to dialect name: Dawson 1881

 

MEANING:

 "According to Dawson 'chaap wurrong' means 'soft' or 'broad lip'. Elsewhere he lists 'Ta'ap' at the 'Chaap wuurong word for soft". (Clarke, 1990, p.106)

 

GENERAL DESCRIPTION OF LANGUAGE AREA:

"Djab wurrung language is spoken in western Victoria and is centred between and around the townships of Stawell, Ararat and parts of Gariwerd (Grampians)."(Victorian Aboriginal Corporation for Languages, 2011), authorised by Tim Chatfield, Djab wurrung Traditional Owner, 2012.

 

KEY LANDMARKS:

Dunkeld

Lake Bolac

Lake Boloke

     Stawell

Salt Creek

Mt. Langi Ghiran

Hexham

Halls Gap

Germantown

Penshurst

Wickliffe

Mt. Rouse

Great Western

Hamilton

Caramut

Mortlake

Glenn Thompson

Pomonal

Sourced from (Clarke, 1990, p 108)

 

PLACENAMES:

English

Language Origin

Meaning an Language Source

Mt Abrupt

Mautterchoke

‘blunt, useless (his) arm (Djabwurrung)

Ararat

Tallarambooroo

uncertain (Djabwurrung)

Lake Bolac

Bulluc

swamp, lake (Djabwurrung)

Mt Cole

Bereep-by-bereep

wild mount (Djabwurrung)

Great Western

Bindowrim

uncertain (Djabwurrung)

Halls gap

Budgem Budgem

uncertain (Djabwurrung)

My Langi Ghiran

Lar.ner.jeering

home of the black cockatoo (Djabwurrung)

Mt Napier

Tappoc

uncertain (Djabwurrung)

Mt Rouse

Kuulor

lava; lava stone used to rub ochre (Djabwurrung, Maar)

Mt Rouse (crater)

Kuulmittop

oval shape (Djabwurrung)

Mt Rouse (sink hole)

Yarrt mirng

white eye (Djabwurrung)

Mt Rouse (spring)

Mortom

round (Djabwurrung)

Stawell

Yirip

Iron bark (Djabwurrung)

 Sourced from (Victorian Aboriginal Corporation for Languages Placenames Database, 2002)

 

DIALECTS OF DJAB WURRUNG:

According to Clarke's 2005 'Aboriginal Language Areas in Victoria- a reconstruction', there are three dialects of Djab Wurrung:

‘Djabwurrung, Pirtpirttwurrung, and Knenknenwurrung’

“On the basis that Dawson identified Djabwurrung as one of four primary languages spoken in Western Victoria, we can regard the Djabwurrung dialect name as the probable language name. The Djabwurrung language shared 80 percent common vocabulary with Djadjawurrung, 70 percent with Wergaia and Wembawemba, 48 percent with Dhauwurdwurrung and 42 percent with Buandig.” (Clark, 2005)

 

PRONOUNCIATION CHART:

(Simplified pronunciation chart, based on 1996 unpublished work by Margaret Sholl)

a

as in 'cart'

i

as in 'feet'

u

as in 'look'

b(p)

as in 'bod' or 'pod'

d(t)

as in 'dab' or 'tab'

g(k)

as in 'god' or 'cod'

rd/rn

"retroflex sound" of 'd' or 'n', pronounced with the tip of the tongue curled backwards.

r

"retroflex sound" of 'r', pronounced with the tip of the tongue curled backwards.

rr

'r' sound, but pronounced with 'a thrill', like in Scotts or Americans do.

ng

as in 'sing'

nj

as in 'onion' or 'canyon'

n

as in 'November'

m

as in 'milk'

l

as in 'look'

y

as in 'you'

w

as in 'water'

(Note: With b/p, d/t, or g/k sounds (consonants); some people would sound as if they are pronouncing 'one or the other' of the listed pair. That is a natural differentiation in everyday speech, and is acceptable.)

 

 

SAMPLE WORDS:

mother

pap

father

mam

daughter

manggap

baby

pupup

younger brother

kuti

elder brother

wawi

friend

kupa nyam

boy

tambaka

girl

puna-punai

emu

parramal

dingo

wilkerr

snake

kurnwil

mouth

wurru

hand

manya

head

purrp

eye

mir

face

mirng pa kia

body

peng

(Sourced from Blake, 2011)

 

 COMMUNITY LANGUAGE CONTACT:

Tim Chatfield           This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

 Language query protocols

If you would like to use Indigenous words to name a public place, facility or program it is protocol to use words from the Indigenous language of the land where the place to be named stands, or where the program is run. It is then appropriate to seek permission from the Traditional Owners of that language area to use their words in the name.

If you are in contact with, or know of Traditional Owners from the Country where you are naming, it is best to approach them first. If further assistance is required, or if you do not know any Traditional Owners for that area then you can contact V.A.C.L. on 9600 3811 or by submitting a language query.  To submit a language query, follow the link below.

 http://vaclang.org.au/Languages/language-query.html

 

More in this category: « Dhauwurd Wurrung Bangerang »